6 Beautiful Indigenous Plants of Mississippi

6 Beautiful Indigenous Plants of Mississippi

Whether you are a novice gardener or have a green thumb, consider planting one of these indigenous plants of Mississippi. These plants are easy to grow, as they don’t require much help. Some smell terrific, some bear fruit to make jellies and wine, and others (even though they’re not edible) are beautiful and will give your land a great new look.

Red Buckeye

Aesculus pavia Linnaeus

Hippocastanaceae

 Red Buckeye

The red buckeye gets its name from its spiny red flowers that are a favorite of hummingbirds and bees. It only grows to be 10 feet tall and thrives in the dryer slopes of creekbanks and rivers. However, it’s important to note that the flowers can be poisonous to humans.

American Sweet Olive

Osmanthus americanus (L.) Gray

Oleaceae

 American Sweet Olive

The sweet olive isn’t wildly impressive, but it’s a favorite among southern gardeners as this shrub can grow up to 20 feet tall. In late winter and early spring, the plant’s small white flowers bloom and releases a distinctive, delicious scent into the air.

American Beautyberry

Callicarpa Americana Linnaeus

Verbenaceae

 American Beautyberry

A short, wide bush that can grow in most soil types, the beautyberry prefers to grow at the edges of a forest or along fences. In springtime, small rosy flowers bloom and slowly turn into beautiful purple berries in the summer. The berries are edible and many individuals use them to make jellies and wines.

Buttonbush

Cephalanthus occidentalis Linnaeus

Rubiaceae

 Buttonbush

Easily recognizable due to its white, spiny, globe-like flower, buttonbush is popular with bees and butterflies. It is a large shrub that can grow 10 feet tall—it has a sprawling form that sprouts in groups. Buttonbush flourishes near shallow waters and swamps with wet soil. Plus, local birds love the seeds it drops in autumn.

Witch Hazel

Hamamelis virginiana Linnaeus

Hamamelidaceae

 Witch Hazel

Botanists classify this deciduous plant as a large shrub or a small tree. It can grow to be 15 feet tall and is seen along stream banks and in thick woodlands. The large scalloped leaves turn to a beautiful maize yellow in autumn.

Winterberry Holly

Ilex verticillata (L.) Gray

Aquifoliaceae

 Winterberry Holly

The big red berries are a favorite of many bird species and wildlife. Winterberry holly can grow in many different climates and soil types. When it’s leaves fall off in autumn, the showy berries take center stage and provide some color to on otherwise dreary winter.

Leave a Comment